EXCESSIVE EATING/DRINKING . . . Making the choice

“Let us behave decently, as in the daytime, not in orgies and drunkenness, not in sexual immorality and debauchery, not in dissension and jealousy.” (Reference: Romans 13:13 )

You may not know it beloved, but I can be quite irreverent. Oh . . . you do know that . . . hm. Well then, you won’t be shocked if I say my very first response to this verse was, “does that mean that it is during/only during the night that people behave badly?”

I believe, beloved, you need to read this verse in context to understand it, and do avoid irreverent people such as myself from making comments.

“Besides this, you know what time it is, how it is now the moment for you to wake from sleep. For salvation is nearer to us now than when we became believers; the night is far gone, the day is near. Let us then lay aside the works of darkness and put on the armor of light; let us live honorably as in the day, not in reveling and drunkenness, not in debauchery and licentiousness, not in quarreling and jealousy.” [NRSV Romans 13: 11-13]

The writer of Romans is equating the darkness of night to the lack of knowledge of Christian living; and the light of day as enlightenment and wisdom as to how to live a good Christian life. It is a well-used metaphor, but one that unfairly stigmatizes night and things that have natural dark coloring.

Historic Anabaptist, Pieter Pietersz, wrote “The Way to the City of Peace” in which he cites this verse from Romans chapter 13 but does not employ (much) the imagery of dark and light. He wrote “Therefore . . . let us constantly pray to God for a clear vision, that we may recognize these situations, with which the devil even tempted our Lord. Then there is also high living with the need for expensive clothing, and other unnecessary external glamor, with the lust of the eyes through which the poor person is led away from the love of the Father through carnal lust as drinking, indulging, impure works, as we have already discussed, Rom. 13:13. Many wants make people into slaves of sin in which they seek through false means and other practices to support their evil front and to carry out that which in the end leads to eternal damnation, Phil. 3:19. Therefore, let us gather courage in order to follow the crucified Christ for a little while, who is himself the light which shall lead us through all the struggle and temptations to the desired end in the spiritual Jerusalem, the perfect City of Peace . . .”

There are a good many things in this excerpt from his writing that I like; and since at times I have been critical of some historic Anabaptist writing I felt it only fair to say some positives. First, Pietersz acknowledges that Christ had temptations set before him – not that he gave in, but that in his human form there were attempts to pull into sin. Second, it is deliberate decisions that bring about sin, and desires beyond daily needs that are seen as sinful. Often in historic Anabaptist writing there is the sense that you cannot avoid sin. Here the sinner needs to make the choice. Third, Christ is seen as the light as opposed to activities done in the light or in the dark. And finally, that struggles and temptations come in this life despite our best intentions. It gives the sense of grace, mercy and forgiveness that is sometimes absent.

So you see beloved, I am not always irreverent!

May you beloved make good choices, and chose to follow the truest light which is Christ our Lord. Selah!

Advertisements

About Carole Boshart

I have two blogs on WordPress. "A Simple Desire" which is based on the daily "Sips of Scripture" published and sent out by Third Way Cafe. "Pondering From the Pacific" is based on my reflections on the world - sometimes religious/spiritual, and sometimes not so much.

Your comments are welcome

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s