POLITICAL AUTHORITY . . . Giving what is due

Then he said to them, “Give to Caesar what is Caesar’s, and to God what is God’s.” (Reference: Matthew 22:21 )

The imposition of taxes on a populace has a long and strong tradition. When Christ spoke these words he was holding a coin of the realm that has Caesar’s face on it. But discerning what is Caesar’s and what is not can be a tricky thing. Peter Riedeman wrote a very good guide and explanation for how the historic Anabaptists felt about it, He wrote, “The governments always do wrong when they set out to exterminate nations. [Isa. 10:1-16] Whoever pays them taxes for that, aids them in their wrongdoing and participates in the guilt of their sin. If they try to force us to it, we say with Peter that we must obey God rather than people. [Acts 5:29] We will not obey them in this matter; we will give them nothing that makes us take part in the sins of others. [1 Tim. 5:22] Many governments use Paul’s statement to defend their right to these taxes, [Rom. 13:7] and support themselves with the words of Christ: “Pay Caesar what is due to Caesar.” [Matt. 22:21; Mark 12:17; Luke 20:25] Yet we fear they do so only to avoid the suffering which the cross of Christ brings. They want the approval of people, which results in the disapproval of God. [Gal. 1:10; James 4:4] . . . However, neither Christ’s words nor Paul’s words were intended to permit rulers to carry out every whim . . . the words make a distinction between two things: First, Paul says, “Give what you owe,” and “Pay to whom it is due.” [Rom. 13:7-8] Second, he does not say, “Give to anyone who wants it, and pay whatever someone wants.” Christ also commands us to give to

Caesar what is Caesar’s. [Matt. 22:21] He does not speak at all, as many interpret it, of taxes for warfare and slaughter. The Pharisees asked Christ whether it was right to continue paying an annual tax. History tells us that this annual tax began when Christ was born, during the rule of the emperor Augustus, [Luke 2:1-5] and there was peace in all the world. Thus this tax was not imposed for war or bloodshed.” [Emphasis mine]

The sentence I highlighted I feel applies very well to the U.S. Government, although I would not say congress passing resolutions (or whatever) to send soldiers (also known ironically as “peacekeepers”) is a “whim.” But as a deliberate choice, it is even worse. Modern Anabaptists/Mennonites have a long history also of refusing to pay taxes on the theory that they support war. But as Riedeman points out, not all taxes are for war. Some modern Anabaptists/Mennonites take this into consideration and pay a portion of their tax withholding the percentage that it is reported goes to the war fund. Others live below the tax line so as to avoid the issue. There are many responses.

I am aware, as a consequence of my job, how many other programs are supported by taxes, truly worthy ones that help people in need. For that reason I pay my taxes and pray that the “whim’s” of the government are wise and peaceful ones. And accept the fact that I might be for the time being praying for a losing cause.

I have also thought long and hard for myself what is “Caesar’s” and what is God’s. “Caesar” is entitled to much less things of mine than God is, and I save all the “good stuff” for God, and for my fellow believers. May you, beloved, only give to “Caesar” that which will help humanity, and may you give to God all of your heart, soul, strength, and body. Selah!

About Carole Boshart

I have blog called "Pondering From the Pacific" and it is based on my reflections on the world - sometimes religious/spiritual, and sometimes not so much. Some days roll along smoothly and some days are like rocky shale. But always I cling to my faith . . . . and my sense of humor!

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