Season After Pentecost: The Psalms Passage – Finding comfort in the psalmist’s words

You are righteous, O Lord, and your judgments are right.
You have appointed your decrees in righteousness and in all faithfulness.” (Psalms 119:137 – 138)

It is supposed, and I am not questioning it, that the Psalms were written before the birth of Jesus. Often passages from the Psalms are said to foretell or predict what Jesus will/would do, and what he will/would mean to the Jewish people of that time – and what he means to us. That being the case, these declarations concerning God came into existence longer ago than 2000 years. And will probably withstand the test of time for the next 2000 years – if human existence lasts that long. And this gives me comfort when current events in the United States loom on the horizon.

If you reside in a country other than the United States beloved reader, these events might be more at a distance for you. And their implications not as great; but I suspect that what the people of the United States decide will still make ripples in the global pond. And that gives me comfort too.

My zeal consumes me because my foes forget your words.” (Verse 139)

This line puzzled me, so I looked at in according to the Easy to Read Version – “Something that really upsets me is the thought that my enemies ignore your commands.” Now, this sounds kind of political. And these days I have been very reluctant to dip my toe into anything political; even more so than previously. I found myself, however, pulled into politics. Or more accurately, dismayed when I discover something I previously thought non-political having political underpinnings. Of course, it may be the times we are in that has me giving political shadings to this verse. I should move on quickly.

“Your promise is well tried, and your servant loves it.” (Verse 140)

Yes, much better. As I said, these words come from several centuries back, and I hold tightly to me the promise and premise that God is unchanging, and that the God that Jesus the Christ points to was the same at this writing of the Psalms as he was when Jesus walked the earth, and as the Lord God is now.

“I am small and despised, yet I do not forget your precepts.” (Verse 141)

Other translations tell me “small and despised” is meant to convey the idea that the writer is young and inexperienced – not well thought of by his elders. I am not sure that is true in my case, but I too cling to God’s precepts.

“Your righteousness is an everlasting righteousness, and your law is the truth.
Trouble and anguish have come upon me, but your commandments are my delight.
Your decrees are righteous forever; give me understanding that I may live.” (Verses 142- 144)

Throughout the history that the bible has as its backdrop, there were political situations and issues that were as unsettling then as our modern times are now. The Psalms passages comforted and sustained the people then, as they do now. It is good to remember. And it makes me feel tied and connected to my spiritual forebearers that they looked to the Psalms for comfort and strength. I would encourage and exhort you beloved reader to look to them also. Selah!

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About Carole Boshart

I have two blogs on WordPress. "A Simple Desire" which is based on the daily "Sips of Scripture" published and sent out by Third Way Cafe. "Pondering From the Pacific" is based on my reflections on the world - sometimes religious/spiritual, and sometimes not so much.

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