Season after Pentecost (Proper 14 [19]): The Old Testament Passage – Moves

When I sat down to write this, I had just gotten done posting the unofficial announcement (that may be turning more official as time goes by) that I plan on moving “operations” over to my other blog, “Pondering From the Pacific”. Of course, beloved reader, you are reading this a week and a day after the fact (yes, writers can “use” time machines) so you may have already absorbed the news. This posting will also be appearing on my other blog. But context and background aside, I was thinking which of the Revised Common Lectionary passages for this week I should start with. And it just seems right to start with a story of moving to a new place.


“Jacob settled in the land where his father had lived as an alien, the land of Canaan.
This is the story of the family of Jacob. Joseph, being seventeen years old, was shepherding the flock with his brothers; he was a helper to the sons of Bilhah and Zilpah, his father’s wives; and Joseph brought a bad report of them to their father.” (Genesis 37:1 – 2)

Yes, we have come to the story of Joseph; the next stage of the Lord God establishing a called people. Now you would think with twelve brothers, it would be enough to start a small nation. But the Lord God had something bigger planned. And a very long term plan. And, a plan that would be challenging for everyone involved. It would turn out to be a very “bitter” plan. Regret and drama. But that is so often the case with human free will.

“Now Israel loved Joseph more than any other of his children, because he was the son of his old age; and he had made him a long robe with sleeves. But when his brothers saw that their father loved him more than all his brothers, they hated him, and could not speak peaceably to him.” (Verses 3 – 4)

Israel, if you did not know, was Jacob all grown up and blessed by God. Seems though that dysfunctional family relationships are part of their family heritage.

“Now his brothers went to pasture their father’s flock near Shechem. And Israel said to Joseph, “Are not your brothers pasturing the flock at Shechem? Come, I will send you to them.” He answered, “Here I am.” So he said to him, “Go now, see if it is well with your brothers and with the flock; and bring word back to me.”So he sent him from the valley of Hebron. He came to Shechem, and a man found him wandering in the fields; the man asked him, “What are you seeking?” “I am seeking my brothers,” he said; “tell me, please, where they are pasturing the flock.” The man said, “They have gone away, for I heard them say, ‘Let us go to Dothan.'” So Joseph went after his brothers, and found them at Dothan. They saw him from a distance, and before he came near to them, they conspired to kill him. They said to one another, “Here comes this dreamer.” (Verses 12 – 19)

Yes, we skipped over that part, where Joseph had dreams where he was mightier and more powerful than his brothers, and even his parents. Having a favored “kid brother” is hard enough, but one that walks around with an attitude in a fancy cloak was just too much!

“Come now, let us kill him and throw him into one of the pits; then we shall say that a wild animal has devoured him, and we shall see what will become of his dreams.” But when Reuben heard it, he delivered him out of their hands, saying, “Let us not take his life.” (Verses 20 – 21)

I guess big brothers do look out for their younger brothers . . . . up to a point.

“Reuben said to them, “Shed no blood; throw him into this pit here in the wilderness, but lay no hand on him” –that he might rescue him out of their hand and restore him to his father. So when Joseph came to his brothers, they stripped him of his robe, the long robe with sleeves that he wore; and they took him and threw him into a pit. The pit was empty; there was no water in it. Then they sat down to eat; and looking up they saw a caravan of Ishmaelites coming from Gilead, with their camels carrying gum, balm, and resin, on their way to carry it down to Egypt. Then Judah said to his brothers, “What profit is it if we kill our brother and conceal his blood? Come, let us sell him to the Ishmaelites, and not lay our hands on him, for he is our brother, our own flesh.” And his brothers agreed. When some Midianite traders passed by, they drew Joseph up, lifting him out of the pit, and sold him to the Ishmaelites for twenty pieces of silver. And they took Joseph to Egypt.” ( Verses 22 – 28)

I’m not sure if selling your brother to some traveling strangers is much better than killing him. It seems to me they wanted to be rid of him, and did not care about his fate. They still ended up making their father believe Joseph was dead, and as far as they knew he might have ended up dying anyway. But dreams and dreamers do not die easily, and oft times survive after taking some interesting paths to fruition. And all of the offspring of those blessed by God have a part and purpose. What we think are plans that have a definite end and assured resolution may not turn out the way we thought at all. That is one of the reasons the journey I am on now, moving “operations” to a different site, may prove to be a very interesting one; NOT I hope, as “interesting” as Joseph’s!

May you, beloved reader, have journeys and plans that are blessed by the Lord God! Selah!

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