Season after Pentecost (Proper 10 [15]) : The Old Testament Passages – Tying together two themes; tying two lineages together

I have chosen to use the alternate set of Old Testament and Psalm passages this week – not sure of my reasoning but I felt at the time the Gospel and Epistle passages were better suited to the second set. However, I wanted to give you a little update on Isaac’s wife, Rebekah. She is with child after many years of marriage to Isaac. She came to him as a young woman, but her youth is spent. Isaac had prayed to God for a child and the Lord broke her barrenness. But it was not an easy pregnancy, so she herself prayed to God to inquire why it was so difficult. The Lord answered her saying, Two nations are in your womb, and two peoples born of you shall be divided; the one shall be stronger than the other, the elder shall serve the younger.” When her time to give birth was at hand, there were twins in her womb.” (Genesis 25:23b-24)

And as I sit here and ponder that, it occurs to me it is a perfect lead in to the other Old Testament passage.

For as the rain and the snow come down from heaven, and do not return there until they have watered the earth, making it bring forth and sprout, giving seed to the sower and bread to the eater, so shall my word be that goes out from my mouth; it shall not return to me empty, but it shall accomplish that which I purpose, and succeed in the thing for which I sent it. (Isaiah 55:10-11)

The Lord had promised Abraham that he would be a father of a nation. And what better way to start a nation then by having twin grandchildren. Ah! The Lord said, however, there are two nations in Rebekah’s womb. So, was Abraham the father of one nation or two nations? The fraternal twins were Esau and Jacob. And it was through Jacob that the lineage was passed down. Esau was the older and the stronger, but it was Jacob who received the inheritance.

Let us reflect back on the first two verses from the Isaiah passage that I selected for today. The Word of the Lord goes out and does not return empty but accomplishes that which the Lord intended. What was the intent of the Lord? Esau was the stronger and the older, but his nature was not what the Lord intended to build on. Jacob was younger and not as robust. He stayed close to “home”. He was also sneaky, but met his match in sneaky from his uncle Laban. He fled from home and the wrath of his brother, but found the Lord God and confirmation of his inheritance. He was worthy of the Lord God to wrestle with and Jacob also demanded a blessing from the Divine. And this actually ties to the verses that follow in this passage from Isaiah.

“For you shall go out in joy, and be led back in peace; the mountains and the hills before you shall burst into song, and all the trees of the field shall clap their hands. Instead of the thorn shall come up the cypress; instead of the brier shall come up the myrtle; and it shall be to the LORD for a memorial, for an everlasting sign that shall not be cut off.” (Verses 12 – 13)

Esau, if you allow, was the thorn – rough and hearty. Jacob was the cypress – growing strong in time and useful in worship. Esau was the brier – wild and impulisive. Jacob the myrtle – sweetly scented and even useful when crushed. But do not let me lead to believe that those who are “rough and hearty”, “wild and impulsive” are not also God’s children. I want to make that abundantly clear. Each of us has our use in the Lord’s kingdom. Esau had a part to play, and Jacob had a part to play. While Jacob’s lineage might have been that which is traced down to Jesus, Esau was also a nation. Two nations, the Lord said to Rebekah. Just as Hagar’s son also had his own part to play in the story of the people of God. Those who came from Esau also have a place at the Lord’s table. Just as we can intertwine scripture passages, the children of the Lord God can also intertwine, bringing glory and honor to our Lord. Selah!

Season after Pentecost (Proper 9 [14]) : The Old Testament Passages – Following the Lord God’s Tide

From the play Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare:
There is a tide in the affairs of men [humankind],
Which, taken at the flood,
leads on to fortune;
Omitted, all the voyage of their life,
Is bound in shallows and miseries”

I am leading off, not with a citation from scripture, but a quote that I read in my morning meditations. It is used in the cycle of scripture not for this week, but the week before. As I read it, it seemed to me that it is applicable for today also. This quote was used to support the idea that one should not tarry in coming to faith, but express belief in the Lord God and Jesus Christ when presented with that truth, and to put that faith and belief into action. This idea is in line with the theme of this lectionary year, coming to new and renewed faith.

In today’s passage you will read about several people who took good advantage of the “tide” that came about in their lives and affairs.

So he said, “I am Abraham’s servant. The LORD has greatly blessed my master, and he has become wealthy; he has given him flocks and herds, silver and gold, male and female slaves, camels and donkeys.
And Sarah my master’s wife bore a son to my master when she was old; and he has given him all that he has. My master made me swear, saying, ‘You shall not take a wife for my son from the daughters of the Canaanites, in whose land I live; but you shall go to my father’s house, to my kindred, and get a wife for my son.’ ” (Genesis 24:34-38)

The Lord had helped Abraham prosper. While he made some missteps, for the most part he was faithful to God, and so God was faithful to Abraham. Abraham saw the “tide” that God had set before him, and he waded full in. Now Abraham again, “goes with the tide” and determines to pick a wife for Isaac who would most likely be faithful to God’s intent. Rather than simply settle for one of the ‘local’ girls, he instructs his servant to find a special girl. And Abraham’s servant also goes with the tide that his master has set for him. Consider what they could have missed out on if they had not heeded God’s tide.


“I came today to the spring, and said, ‘O LORD, the God of my master Abraham, if now you will only make successful the way I am going! I am standing here by the spring of water; let the young woman who comes out to draw, to whom I shall say, “Please give me a little water from your jar to drink,” and who will say to me, “Drink, and I will draw for your camels also” –let her be the woman whom the LORD has appointed for my master’s son.’ “Before I had finished speaking in my heart, there was Rebekah coming out with her water jar on her shoulder; and she went down to the spring, and drew. I said to her, ‘Please let me drink.’” (Verses 42 – 45)

The servant does not wish to take any chances, and so seeks to place himself in the tide that is the Lord. He does not wish to depend on his own eye and judgment, but gives over to God to pick the correct girl for Isaac’s wife. Consider what he could have missed out on if he had not heeded God’s tide.

She quickly let down her jar from her shoulder, and said, ‘Drink, and I will also water your camels.’ So I drank, and she also watered the camels. Then I asked her, ‘Whose daughter are you?’ She said, ‘The daughter of Bethuel, Nahor’s son, whom Milcah bore to him.’ So I put the ring on her nose, and the bracelets on her arms. Then I bowed my head and worshiped the LORD, and blessed the LORD, the God of my master Abraham, who had led me by the right way to obtain the daughter of my master’s kinsman for his son.” (Verses 46 – 48)

Rebekah also places herself in God’s tide by helping the stranger and foreigner, and being hospitable and gracious to him. She could have thought of only herself and her household, and not extended graciousness to the stranger. Consider what she could have missed out on if she had not heeded God’s tide.

Now then, if you will deal loyally and truly with my master, tell me; and if not, tell me, so that I may turn either to the right hand or to the left.” And they called Rebekah, and said to her, “Will you go with this man?” She said, “I will.” So they sent away their sister Rebekah and her nurse along with Abraham’s servant and his men. And they blessed Rebekah and said to her, “May you, our sister, become thousands of myriads; may your offspring gain possession of the gates of their foes.” Then Rebekah and her maids rose up, mounted the camels, and followed the man; thus the servant took Rebekah, and went his way.” (Verses 49, 58 – 61)

Laban also took a chance with his sister, and stepped into God’s tide. And, if you will remember other biblical stories, you will remember that by stepping into God’s tide, he made this place, and a second place for himself and his family in God’s plan. Consider what he now and latter on could have missed out on if he had not heeded God’s tide.

Now Isaac had come from Beer-lahai-roi, and was settled in the Negeb. Isaac went out in the evening to walk in the field; and looking up, he saw camels coming. And Rebekah looked up, and when she saw Isaac, she slipped quickly from the camel, and said to the servant, “Who is the man over there, walking in the field to meet us?” The servant said, “It is my master.” So she took her veil and covered herself. And the servant told Isaac all the things that he had done. Then Isaac brought her into his mother Sarah’s tent. He took Rebekah, and she became his wife; and he loved her. So Isaac was comforted after his mother’s death.” (Verses 62 – 67)

Isaac could have insisted on marrying a girl close at hand. He could have insisted on going along and approving of the girl he was to marry. But instead he trusted in his father and his father’s servant, and by extension trusted in God. By all accounts Rebekah was quite beautiful and we know she was compassionate, caring, and giving. Consider what he could have missed out on if he had not heeded God’s tide.

We are all free, beloved reader, to step into God’s tide and go where we are directed. We can refuse to go, resist God, and take our own chances. As William Shakespeare pointed however, are lives will be much less than if we had followed God. Consider Shakespeare himself, writing truths into his plays. Consider how much the world has benefited from his writings. Consider too my heeding this quote, and the writer of the book that I read it in. Consider all these things, beloved reader. Consider all of us – Abraham, his servant, Rebekah, Laban, Isaac, Shakespeare, the writer of the book, and myself – how we have sought out and followed God’s plan and guidance. Now, consider yourself; what will you chose to do? Selah!

Season after Pentecost (Proper 8 [13]) : The Old Testament Passages – In faith I say, “The Lord will Provide”

After these things God tested Abraham. He said to him, “Abraham!” And he said, “Here I am.” (Genesis 22:1)

Trust me, beloved reader, when the Lord calls your name, you may as well answer. But do not doubt that answering the Lord will lead to things you never imagined!

“He said, “Take your son, your only son Isaac, whom you love, and go to the land of Moriah, and offer him there as a burnt offering on one of the mountains that I shall show you.” So Abraham rose early in the morning, saddled his donkey, and took two of his young men with him, and his son Isaac; he cut the wood for the burnt offering, and set out and went to the place in the distance that God had shown him. On the third day Abraham looked up and saw the place far away. Then Abraham said to his young men, “Stay here with the donkey; the boy and I will go over there; we will worship, and then we will come back to you.”(Verses 2 – 5)

Now we know this story well enough to know what happened in the short term and in the long term. So let us glean other aspects of this story as Abraham and Isaac make their way to the mountain where they do not know what will happen.

Abraham did not want the young men that he brought with him to know what the Lord expected him to do. He had not even told Isaac, which I totally understand. But just what did Abraham think would happen when he came back WITHOUT his son?! What sort of story would he tell the two young men who must have known how much his son meant to him. And what did Abraham think he was going to tell his wife Sarah about what happened to he beloved son that she did not believe would come, and for whom she sent away Hagar and her son? So often we rush to the end of this story, or knowing how it would end, we are loathe to consider what the consequences could have been! And what of Abraham himself, who must have seen how his legacy would soon be at an end!

“Abraham took the wood of the burnt offering and laid it on his son Isaac, and he himself carried the fire and the knife. So the two of them walked on together.” (Verse 6)

Abraham must have been fairly old to not be able to carry the wood that was to be used; and Isaac must have been more than just a young tot to carry the wood. And if Abraham was that old, he must have thought that he would never have another child. And if Isaac was hold enough to carry wood, how did Abraham think he would manage if Isaac resisted?

“Isaac said to his father Abraham, “Father!” And he said, “Here I am, my son.” He said, “The fire and the wood are here, but where is the lamb for a burnt offering?” (Verse 7)

Notice how Isaac calls to his father, and his father answers him – as the Lord called Abraham and he answered in complete faith and trust.

“Abraham said, “God himself will provide the lamb for a burnt offering, my son.” So the two of them walked on together. When they came to the place that God had shown him, Abraham built an altar there and laid the wood in order. He bound his son Isaac, and laid him on the altar, on top of the wood. Then Abraham reached out his hand and took the knife to kill his son.” (Verses 8 – 10)

So here we are, at the moment. I have read other versions and paraphrases that strongly indicate that Isaac put his complete trust in his father, as much as Abraham put his trust in the Lord. Have we ever held back, beloved reader, because did not put our complete trust in the Lord God? When the Lord God calls us, have we ever held back because we suspected we would be called on to do things we would rather not? It reminds me of when the Lord God called for Adam & Eve in the Garden of Eden, and they hid because they knew that had done counter to the Lord’s wishes.

“But the angel of the LORD called to him from heaven, and said, “Abraham, Abraham!” And he said, “Here I am.” (Verse 11)

And here, beloved reader, is the payoff for answering the Lord God swiftly and completely.

“He said, “Do not lay your hand on the boy or do anything to him; for now I know that you fear God, since you have not withheld your son, your only son, from me.” And Abraham looked up and saw a ram, caught in a thicket by its horns. Abraham went and took the ram and offered it up as a burnt offering instead of his son. So Abraham called that place “The LORD will provide”; as it is said to this day, “On the mount of the LORD it shall be provided.” (Verses 12 – 14)

“The Lord will provide.” If it is not a reminder to you, beloved reader, it is certainly a reminder to me. I am still in the midst of a job search, as I write this, and wondering mightily what and how the Lord will provide. Just as Abraham had to trust, so must I. I have not been asked to place anything on an altar to sacrifice . . . . except my hope for the future. Not like sacrificing a child, but still, I am hopeful that something will come soon that will answer my needs.

Until then I journey on, knowing the Lord is with me. May it be so for you too beloved reader. Selah!

Season after Pentecost (Proper 7 [12]) : The Old Testament Passages – When hope grows dim

The child grew, and was weaned; and Abraham made a great feast on the day that Isaac was weaned. But Sarah saw the son of Hagar the Egyptian, whom she had borne to Abraham, playing with her son Isaac. So she said to Abraham, “Cast out this slave woman with her son; for the son of this slave woman shall not inherit along with my son Isaac.”The matter was very distressing to Abraham on account of his son.” (Genesis 21:8-11)

In our modern society a child might be weaned by 1 year old, but it is quite possible that young Isaac was two or three years old. Old enough that he had survived infancy and all the illness and injury that comes with those fragile delicate years. He was eating solid food and was thriving. It indeed was a celebration that he had firmly taken his place in the land of living.

But being alive and healthy, as was Hagar’s son, might that he would most probably grow to adulthood and be the inheritor of all that God promised. And Sarah, being a possessive mother, did want that shared with the usurper son of Hagar.

I have to say, I dismayed that there was not a camaraderie between the two women. As we know from other biblical characters, a man having more than one wife was not unusual. Often biblical studies among women studies and considers the life of Hagar as much a worthy topic as the life of Sarah and other wives to men of God. I think that is very good.

“But God said to Abraham, “Do not be distressed because of the boy and because of your slave woman; whatever Sarah says to you, do as she tells you, for it is through Isaac that offspring shall be named for you. As for the son of the slave woman, I will make a nation of him also, because he is your offspring.” So Abraham rose early in the morning, and took bread and a skin of water, and gave it to Hagar, putting it on her shoulder, along with the child, and sent her away. And she departed, and wandered about in the wilderness of Beer-sheba.” (Verses 12 – 14)

One of the things I hope studies of Hagar show is that everyone is a part of God’s plan and under God’s blessing. Especially those who do not think they are.

“When the water in the skin was gone, she cast the child under one of the bushes. Then she went and sat down opposite him a good way off, about the distance of a bowshot; for she said, “Do not let me look on the death of the child.” And as she sat opposite him, she lifted up her voice and wept. And God heard the voice of the boy; and the angel of God called to Hagar from heaven, and said to her, “What troubles you, Hagar? Do not be afraid; for God has heard the voice of the boy where he is. Come, lift up the boy and hold him fast with your hand, for I will make a great nation of him.” (Verses 15 – 18)

I have read that Hagar did her son a mercy, sheltering him under a brush, away from the heat of the son. We can assume she hoped she would die first, so she would not have to see his agony. But also hoped, I am sure, that under the brush he would not see her perish. And that might have been the end of the story. But the God of the Old Testament was not done, had not closed the chapter on Hagar and her son.

“Then God opened her eyes and she saw a well of water. She went, and filled the skin with water, and gave the boy a drink. God was with the boy, and he grew up; he lived in the wilderness, and became an expert with the bow. He lived in the wilderness of Paran; and his mother got a wife for him from the land of Egypt.” (Verses 19 – 21)

When I sat down to consider the two Old Testament passages this week, I could not decide which one to use. And as I looked at them both, I realized there are many similar themes in these two passages. Maybe the constructors of the Revised Common Lectionary thought the same thing.

O LORD, you have enticed me, and I was enticed; you have overpowered me, and you have prevailed. I have become a laughingstock all day long; everyone mocks me. For whenever I speak, I must cry out, I must shout, “Violence and destruction!” For the word of the LORD has become for me a reproach and derision all day long.” (Jeremiah 20:7-8)

Just as Hagar cried out in her distress, the writer of the book of Jeremiah cries out in distress also. Both are called to a difficult life, and struggle in what seems to be their fate.

“If I say, “I will not mention him, or speak any more in his name,” then within me there is something like a burning fire shut up in my bones; I am weary with holding it in, and I cannot. For I hear many whispering: “Terror is all around! Denounce him! Let us denounce him!” All my close friends are watching for me to stumble. “Perhaps he can be enticed, and we can prevail against him, and take our revenge on him.” (Verses 9 – 10)

I am sure Hagar felt used and abused, forced into motherhood not because of a relationship that promised support and respect but used to fulfill the hopes and dreams of an old man. And then when she had done what was required of her, she was set aside and driven off in favor of another. And as I compare these two passages, Hagar’s pleas and Jeremiah’s pleas came together in my mind. Jeremiah was called to prophesy, and as he laments, prophesies that was not well received. While he follows his calling from the Lord, he is punished by those around him. But if he determines not to speak, he is tormented inside. Where can he turn? Where could Hagar turn?

“But the LORD is with me like a dread warrior; therefore my persecutors will stumble, and they will not prevail. They will be greatly shamed, for they will not succeed. Their eternal dishonor will never be forgotten.” (Verses 11)

It would be simple, and simplistic, of me to say, “See, call upon the Lord and your problems will be gone!” It is not that simple, and I do an injustice to both Hagar and Jeremiah if I gloss over and erase their distress. When one cries out to the Lord, one does not know what the answer will be or even if there will be a favorable answer.

“O LORD of hosts, you test the righteous, you see the heart and the mind; let me see your retribution upon them, for to you I have committed my cause. Sing to the LORD; praise the LORD! For he has delivered the life of the needy from the hands of evildoers” (Verses 12 – 13)

It is only . . . only on the other side of our troubles that we can see and say where I deliverance was. And it is only those who are delivered that are able to speak of it. Tragedy and disaster happen every day, and the victims of it multiply over the generations. I give you not false promise and insubstantial hope. I tell you (or rather the RCL) tells you these stories so that you know you are not the only one that has been set against. We who have lost hope in the desert, and feel torn between two opposing sides, have our own stories to tell. And tell them we will. Selah!

Season after Pentecost (Proper 6 [11]) : Old Testament Passage – Starting on a long and potentially confusing road

The Revised Common Lectionary has a certain parlance (way of referring) to the Sundays in Ordinary Time (the time NOT of Advent/Christmas & Lent/Easter). Recap anyone?

While the church year is strewn with special days and celebrations, there are two main seasonal times of the church; Advent/Christmas & Lent/Easter. Other days such as Transfiguration Sunday and Pentecost Sunday are also noteworthy time. Aside from these times are what is called Ordinary Time and is counted by how many Sundays after the last major event. But basically it is just Sunday after Sunday of just weekly worship and support for circles of faith. The lectionary gives numbers to these Sundays to help worshipers, laity, and ministers/pastors/preachers to keep track of this passage of time. This Sunday, June 18th is the first Sunday after Pentecost which signals the absolute end of the Easter season (last major church celebration time) and is numbered/names “Proper 6”, also known as “11”. The listing of lectionary passages I use also matches the dates to this numbering. Don’t worry if it sounds utterly confusing; I have to reorient myself a few times after the Easter season is over. After you have worked with it, it gets easier to pinpoint just when and where you are.

Now, to further complicate things, there are two sets of Old Testament/Psalms readings, and followers of the lectionary are free to choose which set to follow each Sunday. I had in the past tended to stick to using the first set all the time. But going into the third year of commenting on the lectionary, I decided to change things up, and am using the second set this week. Thoroughly confused yet?

Now, imagine yourself just newly released from a place that multiple generations before you had lived and all the things you had relied on are suddenly gone – every convenience and stable resource . . . gone! I imagine you might be as confused from that experience as trying to decipher the way the RCL organizes itself.


“They had journeyed from Rephidim, entered the wilderness of Sinai, and camped in the wilderness; Israel camped there in front of the mountain. Then Moses went up to God; the LORD called to him from the mountain, saying, “Thus you shall say to the house of Jacob, and tell the Israelites:You have seen what I did to the Egyptians, and how I bore you on eagles’ wings and brought you to myself. Now therefore, if you obey my voice and keep my covenant, you shall be my treasured possession out of all the peoples. Indeed, the whole earth is mine, but you shall be for me a priestly kingdom and a holy nation. These are the words that you shall speak to the Israelites.” (Exodus 19:2 – 6)

In a situation like that, beloved reader, how might you act and respond?

So Moses came, summoned the elders of the people, and set before them all these words that the LORD had commanded him. The people all answered as one: “Everything that the LORD has spoken we will do.” (Verse 7 – 8a)

And I am sure when they said it, the Israelites gathered under Moses’ leadership meant it. But the forty years were grueling years, and many who started out where no longer alive when the promised land was reached. In fact I seem to remember that being the plan because the original Israelites weren’t able to sustain the sort of obedience that the God of Moses demanded.

You must be wondering however, beloved reader, how the wandering of the Israelites and the confusion of the lectionary connect in my mind. It is simply this. The lectionary gives a road map to finding our way through the bible, but it is up to us to apply it and live it out. Reading the lectionary passages each week will not automatically give you the answers you need. In fact, figuring out and deciphering the numbering system and progression of the lectionary throughout will not guarantee you enlightenment and salvation either!

This lectionary year, being Year A, is the year where the focus is coming to faith anew. Unbelief to belief, or moving from a shallower faith to a deeper faith. From this point on until the beginning of Advent we will journey week by week uncovering new ways of coming to and living out our faith. Whether the path be confusing and winding, or straight ahead and long, I pray you may learn along the way. Selah!


Trinity Sunday: The Old Testament Passage – The perfection of creation . . . and then there was us!

In the beginning when God created the heavens and the earth. the earth was a formless void and darkness covered the face of the deep, while a wind from God swept over the face of the waters. Then God said, “Let there be light”; and there was light. And God saw that the light was good; and God separated the light from the darkness. God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. And there was evening and there was morning, the first day.” (Genesis 1:1 – 5)

Many civilizations have a creation story. Other than the one in Genesis, I know one or two of them. Or know enough of them to know, many or most civilizations have one. The one in Genesis is simply the Jewish one, or the one of that area. It is, I think, the only one that has a monotheistic God. But then Judaism/Christianity is one of the few monotheistic faith systems.

I actually like the one in Genesis very much, aside from it being the one associated with the Christian faith system. It has a personal and intimate edge and tone to it that draws me in every time. Even better, it is so easy to retell inserting even more emotion and intimacy than the way it is presented in scripture.

“And God said, “Let there be a dome in the midst of the waters, and let it separate the waters from the waters.” So God made the dome and separated the waters that were under the dome from the waters that were above the dome. And it was so. God called the dome Sky. And there was evening and there was morning, the second day.” (Verses 6 – 8)

I also like, very much, Trinity Sunday. I like (the word “like”, however, does not do just to my the intensity of my feelings) the concept of a Triune God. It seems fitting to me that a God who embraces the acts of creation who have multiple aspects to the Divine’s nature and character. A Triune Lord embraces the possibility of many faith traditions yet keep to a monotheistic model.

“And God said, “Let the waters under the sky be gathered together into one place, and let the dry land appear.” And it was so. God called the dry land Earth, and the waters that were gathered together he called Seas. And God saw that it was good. Then God said, “Let the earth put forth vegetation: plants yielding seed, and fruit trees of every kind on earth that bear fruit with the seed in it.” And it was so. The earth brought forth vegetation: plants yielding seed of every kind, and trees of every kind bearing fruit with the seed in it. And God saw that it was good. And there was evening and there was morning, the third day.” (Verses 9 – 13)

I have had the honor on several occasions to tell the creation story to someone who has never heard it as a story of a mighty Lord who bends down to form a world from dirt and water. Or more precisely, to form “something” where there was once “nothing.” It reminds me that we are stewards of the earth, and that the earth has come a far distance from first creation. The Lord created it “perfectly”, then handed it over to humanity. If the earth is now diseased and ailing, it because of what humanity has done. It also reminds me we have done just as “good a job” in caring for our fellow humans.

“And God said, “Let there be lights in the dome of the sky to separate the day from the night; and let them be for signs and for seasons and for days and years, and let them be lights in the dome of the sky to give light upon the earth.” And it was so. God made the two great lights–the greater light to rule the day and the lesser light to rule the night–and the stars. God set them in the dome of the sky to give light upon the earth, to rule over the day and over the night, and to separate the light from the darkness. And God saw that it was good. And there was evening and there was morning, the fourth day.” (Verses 14 – 19)

It does not stretch my faith to encompass the fact that creation did not happen in 6 days, or 6 weeks, or anything else like that. I am quite willing to accept the millennia concept of creation – that dinosaurs etc roamed the planet and that humanity did not start out in the form that we find in Genesis but that we too had many steps in our evolution. The Lord God created the reason for the division of days and nights but we put the numbers to it, so why should we expect the Divine to keep to our system of enumerating the passage of time?

“And God said, “Let the waters bring forth swarms of living creatures, and let birds fly above the earth across the dome of the sky.” So God created the great sea monsters and every living creature that moves, of every kind, with which the waters swarm, and every winged bird of every kind. And God saw that it was good. God blessed them, saying, “Be fruitful and multiply and fill the waters in the seas, and let birds multiply on the earth.” And there was evening and there was morning, the fifth day.” (Verses 20 – 23)

What the Lord God established in creation is the building blocks of DNA, RNA, genes, cells, and matter. Everyone that is alive today, and everyone who had life, comes from the same source. Why would we give lessor value to some members of humanity than others? We come from the same source of Divine creation.

“And God said, “Let the earth bring forth living creatures of every kind: cattle and creeping things and wild animals of the earth of every kind.” And it was so. God made the wild animals of the earth of every kind, and the cattle of every kind, and everything that creeps upon the ground of every kind. And God saw that it was good. Then God said, “Let us make humankind in our image, according to our likeness; and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the birds of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the wild animals of the earth, and over every creeping thing that creeps upon the earth.” So God created humankind in his image, in the image of God he created them; male and female he created them.” (Verses 24 – 27)

Humanity was created in the image of God. Does that, should that, tell us what God is like? Two arms, two legs and everything in-between? Furthermore, Jesus was sent as a human being to bridge the gap between the Divine and humanity – a further indication that we are made in the image of God. And if this is so, how can we give less honor and respect to some members of humanity than others?

“God blessed them, and God said to them, “Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the earth and subdue it; and have dominion over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the air and over every living thing that moves upon the earth.” God said, “See, I have given you every plant yielding seed that is upon the face of all the earth, and every tree with seed in its fruit; you shall have them for food. And to every beast of the earth, and to every bird of the air, and to everything that creeps on the earth, everything that has the breath of life, I have given every green plant for food.” And it was so. God saw everything that he had made, and indeed, it was very good. And there was evening and there was morning, the sixth day. Thus the heavens and the earth were finished, and all their multitude.” (Chapter 1 verses 28 – 31 and Chapter two verse 1)

Now, if you will look at those verses closely, beloved reader, you will see that the food chain then is not the same as the food chain now. Basically, everyone and everything is a herbivore. There was no “something eat something” world. There was utter peace, shalom. Everything was as the Divine intended. And the Divine handed this perfection over to humanity.

“And on the seventh day God finished the work that he had done, and he rested on the seventh day from all the work that he had done. So God blessed the seventh day and hallowed it, because on it God rested from all the work that he had done in creation. These are the generations of the heavens and the earth when they were created.” (Verses 2 – 4a)

Into this perfection and unity came imperfection and disunity. The God of creation may have rested on the seventh day, but the God of Salvation and Redemption has continuing work. It is because of humanity that we have a Triune God. We need more than just a God of creation. Let’s face it, we need a lot of things beloved reader! But whatever our needs are, we can find the answer to that need in the Lord God.

Pentecost Sunday; The Old Testament Passage – Pentecost is coming!

It will be a busy week – the Spirit is coming! But that is really not anything new. The Spirit of God has always been accessible; just not in as apparent a way in the Old Testament as it is in the New. Or, maybe it is just that people after Jesus’ ministry on earth craved the type of intimate relationship that they had with Jesus, and that Jesus exemplified between himself and the Lord God.

So Moses went out and told the people the words of the LORD; and he gathered seventy elders of the people, and placed them all around the tent. Then the LORD came down in the cloud and spoke to him, and took some of the spirit that was on him and put it on the seventy elders; and when the spirit rested upon them, they prophesied. But they did not do so again.” (Numbers 11:24 – 25)

Just as Jesus said to Nicodemus, the Spirit blows where it will, and we have a hard time seeing it. But we can feel it and know it. And welcome it.

“Two men remained in the camp, one named Eldad, and the other named Medad, and the spirit rested on them; they were among those registered, but they had not gone out to the tent, and so they prophesied in the camp. And a young man ran and told Moses, “Eldad and Medad are prophesying in the camp.” And Joshua son of Nun, the assistant of Moses, one of his chosen men, said, “My lord Moses, stop them!” (Verses 26 – 28)

I am not sure what Joshua son of Nun was so concerned about. Was it fear? Was it unfamiliarity with the ways of the Spirit? Or was it as Moses suggested, that he felt prophesy was only the purview of Moses?

“But Moses said to him, “Are you jealous for my sake? Would that all the Lord’s people were prophets, and that the LORD would put his spirit on them!” And Moses and the elders of Israel returned to the camp.” (Verses 29 – 30)

I have to think about what Moses said and agree. Would it not be wonderful if all people everywhere had the Lord’s Spirit in them. It would make life on earth like heaven. And that, I am afraid, is the exact point. We live in a fallen and fallible world. Many say they are guided by the Lord and the Lord’s Spirit. But there are also people like Joshua son of Nun who want to contain and quantify/qualify the gifting and blessing of the Spirit. The Spirit is not under control of any person but is part of the Divine. And even if we, as devote followers of the Lord God Jesus Christ, would love to be imbued with the Spirit it does not happen that way. Of course, we need to be and remain open to the indwelling of the Spirit.

As I said and to better explain, the day that celebrates the first Pentecost is coming. Let us yearn for that experience for ourselves! Selah!